Final Statistics to Include

Statistics on the State of Women and Hollywood

FILM

Women directed 4.7% of studio films from 2009-2013
Women directed 10% of independent films from 2009-2013

2013

Women Behind the Scenes

  • “Women were 16% of the directors, executive producers, producers, writers, cinematographers, and editors working on the top 250 domestic grossing films.
  • Women directed 6% of the films.
  • Women wrote 10% of the movies
  • Women comprised 15% of all executive producers.
  • Women accounted for 25% of all producers.”
  • Women comprised 17% of all editors.
  • Women accounted for 3% of all cinematographers.
  • Women comprised 2% of all composers.
  • Women accounted for 23% of production designers.
  • Women comprised 4% of sound designers.
  • Women accounted for 9% of all supervising sound editors.
  • Women comprised 2% of all special effects supervisors.
  • Women accounted for 5% of all visual effects supervisors.

Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film

2012

Women Behind the Scenes

  • “Women were 18% of the directors, executive producers, producers, writers, cinematographers, and editors working on the top 250 domestic grossing films.
  • Women directed 9% of the films.”
  • Women wrote 15% of the movies.
  • Women comprised 17% of all executive producers.
  • Women accounted for 25% of all producers.
  • Women comprised 20% of all editors.
  • Women accounted for 2% of all cinematographers.

Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film

2011
Women Behind the Scenes

  • “Women directed 5% of the top grossing films.”
  • Women wrote 14% of the top grossing films.
  • “Women comprised 18% of all executive producers.”
  • “Women comprised 25% of all producers.”
  • 20% of all editors were women.
  • 4% of all cinematographers were women.

Stats from the Center for Study of Women in TV and Film

2010

Women Behind the Scenes
• “Women directed 7% of the top 250 grossing films.”
• Women wrote 10% of the top 250 grossing films of 2010
• “Women comprised 15% of all executive producers.”
• “Women comprised 24% of all producers.”
• 18% of all editors were women.
• 2% of all cinematographers were women.

Stats from the Center for Study of Women in TV and Film

2009

Women Behind the Scenes

  • “Women directed 7% of the top 250 grossing films.”
  • Women wrote 8% of the top 250 grossing films.
  • “Women made up 23% of all producers”
  • 18% of all editors were women
  • 2% of all cinematographers were women.

Center for the Study of Women in TV and Film, San Diego State U.
2008

Women Behind the Scenes

  • Only 6 of the top 50 grossing films (12 of the top 100 films) starred or were focused on women.
  • “Women comprised 9% of all directors.”
  • Women accounted for 12% of writers.
  • “Women comprised 16% of all executive producers.”
  • “Women accounted for 23% of all producers.”
  • Women accounted for 17% of all editors.
  • Women accounted for 25% of production managers.
  • Women comprised 44% of production supervisors.
  • Women accounted for 20% of all production designers.
  • Women comprised 5% of sound designers.
  • Women accounted for 5% of supervising sound editors.
  • Women comprised 1% of key grips.
  • Women accounted for 1% of gaffers.
  • Women comprise only 23% of film critics at daily newspapers.
  • Women comprised 22% of directors working on films appearing at the major film festivals compared to 9% on top grossing films.
  • Women accounted for 19% of writers working on films appearing at festivals but only 12% on top grossing films.
  • Women accounted for 33% of producers working on films appearing at festivals but only 20% of those working on top grossing films.
  • Women comprised 23% of editors working on festival films compared to 17% of those working on top grossing films.
  • Women comprised 9% of directors of photography working on festival films but only 4% of those working on top grossing films.
  • Overall, women comprised a larger percentage of behind-the-scenes workers on documentaries than narrative features.  Of all behind-the-scenes individuals working on documentaries, 29% were female and 71% were male.  Of all behind-the-scenes individuals working on narrative features, 18% were female and 78% were male.”

2007

Behind the Scenes

  • “In 2007, women only comprised 15% of all directors, executive producers, writers, cinematographers, and editors working on the top 250 grossing films.”
  • “In 2007, only 6% of the top 250 grossing films were directed by women.”
  • In 2007, only 5 of the top 50 films starred or were focused on women.

Sundance Research for Film Screened at the Festival From 2002-2012

  • “29.8% of filmmakers (directors, writers, producers, cinematographers and editors) were female.”
  • 23.9% of the films in this study were directed by women.
  • Films directed by women feature more women in all roles.  There is a 21% increase in women working on a narrative film when there is a female director and a 24% of women working on documentaries.
  • Females direct more documentaries than narrative films – 34.5% vs 16.9%.

International Study of Films Released Worldwide (G,PG, PG-13 films released 2010-2013)

  • The Center found that women accounted for 16 percent of all directors, executive producers, producers, writers, cinematographers and editors for the top 250 domestically made films in 2013. That reflects a 2 percent drop since 2012 and a 1 percent decline from the 1998 rate. Hovering at 25 percent, the count of women producers was unchanged, according to the study, which, for the first time, also took a census of female composers, production designers, sound designers, special effects supervisors, supervising sound editors and visual effects supervisors.
  • In terms of behind-the-scenes absence in those categories, 99 percent of films had no female special effects supervisors; 97 percent of films had no female composers, sound designers or sound editors; and 91 per cent had no women as visual effects supervisors.
– Of the 1,163 content creators working behind the camera on 82 U.S. films at Sundance in 2013, 28.9 percent were women and 71.1 percent were men. Broken down by storytelling genre, 23.8 percent of content creators in narrative films and 40.4 percent in documentary films were women.
– Of the 432 fledgling filmmakers in a year-long Sundance Institute training and
mentoring fellowship between 2002 and 2013, 42.6 percent were female. Women
comprised 39.3 percent of the fellows in the Feature Film Program and 54.5 percent
of the fellows in the Documentary Film Program.
– Based on responses from 34 filmmakers and film industry decision-makers at the 2013
Sundance Film Festival, University of Southern California researchers concluded that
32.1 percent of personal traits deemed as markers of a successful film director were
masculine and 19.3 percent were feminine, according to USC’s update of a 2012 report
on the prior decade’s female presence at Sundance. (The remaining, perceived traits of successful directors were gender-neutral.)
-In 25 of the 98 Nordic fiction films released in 2012, the lead actors, directors, producers and scriptwriters were all men;

In only one of the 98 films were all these positions held by women;
The most gender balanced position is the producer in the Swedish and Danish sectors.
-Yet the Doha Film Institute in Qatar, which funds local film-makers, reports that 42% of all its grants since 2010 have been to women, and that last year a third of all films shown at the Doha Tribeca Film Festival were by female directors.
– In December, 1979, an association of women filmworkers was established in West Berlin (Verband der Filmarbeiterinnen). The organization distributed a manifesto at the Hamburg Film Festival (1979) demanding that 50% of all film subsidies go to women filmworkers and special money go toward distributing and exhibiting films by women.
-Between 2007 and 2010 just 11.8% of UK films released were directed by women.

2011 BFI Statistical Yearbook

In an extended list of the critics’ Top 250 Films of All Time only 7 were directed by women.

-In 2012, only five of the top 100 films at the Australian box office had a female director. Just one of these films was solely directed by a woman, the other four were co-directed by a man.

– Of the 20 top grossing films of 2011 in Germany (accounting for more than 20 million sold tickets) only 1 was directed by a woman.

Around 20% of all the feature films made in Sweden are by women.

Only 29 percent of feature films granted funding by SFI (Swedish Film Institute) in 2009 were directed by women.

-Between 2000 and 2009 women directors were responsible for 23 percent of feature film debuts in Sweden.

In over 80 years only one woman has ever won the Academy Award for Best Director – Kathryn Bigelow (2009 – The Hurt Locker).

At the 2010 and 2012 Cannes Film Festivals there were no women directors shortlisted for the Palme d’Or. The highest number of women directors who have been shortlisted is four (20%), in 2011.

-Even more worryingly, women accounted for just 7.8% of directors on UK films in 2012, a decrease of more than 7% year-on-year (15% in 2011).

– Of the independent UK films released between 2010 and 2012, just 16% of the writers and 11% of the directors were women. However, for the top 20 UK independent films over the same period, women represented 37% of the writers and 18% of the directors. And for profitable UK independent films, 30% of the writers were women.
-In 2013, of the 155 identified writers of UK films released during the year, 22 (14%) were women
  • Women make up only 23% of crew members on the 2,000 highest grossing films of the past 20 years.
  • Only one of the top 100 films in 2013 has a female Composer.
  • In 2013, under 2% of Directors were female.
  • The only departments to have a majority of women are Make-up, Casting and Costume
  • Visual Effects is the largest department on most major movies and yet only has 17.5% women
  • Of all the departments, the Camera and Electrical department is the most male, with only 5% women
  • Musicals and Music-based films have the highest proportion of women in their crews (27%).
  • Sci-Fi and Action films have the smallest proportion of women (20% and 21% respectively).
  • The films with the highest percentage were “Mean Girls” and “The Sisterhood of the Travelling Pants” (42%).
  • The most male crews were “On Deadly Ground” and “Robots” (10% female).
  • There has been no improvement in the last 20 years. The percentage of female crew members has decreased between 1994 (22.7%) and 2013 (21.8%).
  • The three most significant creative roles (Writer, Producer and Director) have all seen the percentage of women fall.
  • The jobs performed by women have become more polarised. In jobs which are traditionally seen as more female (art, costume and make-up) the percentage of women has increased, whereas in the more technical fields (editing and visual effects) the percentage of women has fallen.

-In fact, in 1994 the average percentage of women on a film crew was 22.7% and by 2013 it had actually shrunk slightly to 21.8%.

-There are many reasons why the under-representation of women in the film industry could be seen as a problem. These include female crew members finding it harder to get hired/paid, employers selecting workers from a pool that is half the size it should be, fewer female role models for aspiring creatives and, of course, justice/ equality/ fairness.

-Other than cinematographers, none of the major job types saw a rise, with only producers holding steady at 25% – itself the biggest category for women. Production designers and editors were the next largest percentage share for women, at 23% and 17%.

– Independently produced films, which typically have lower budgets and skirt Hollywood hierarchy, have consistently kept the door ajar, if not fully open, to women. The findings, based on more than 9,000 credits at 23 film festivals from March 2013 to April 2014, were similar to a previous study in 20011/12. The 26% figure was a modest advance from the 24% recorded in 2008/9.

-The report showed that rather than improving over time, the number of women working with blockbuster film crews in 2013 actually declined from previous years, to an average of just 21.8%. Fewer than 2% of the directors of the top 100 grossing films last year were female and only one had a woman to compose the score.

-Visual effects, usually the largest department for big feature films, had an average of only 17.5% of women, while music had just 16%, and camera and electricals were, on average, 95% male.

My Primary Research questionnaire:

  • 80% of women said they would like to go into the media industry, while 20% said no, as they thought it would be too hard to progress in.
  • However, 75% of men said they would, and 25% said they didn’t know.

Interestingly, the results didn’t seem to be conclusive about whether people thought there were as many opportunities in the media industry for women as for men:

  • 45% of people said there are as many opportunities
  • 45% of people said there aren’t
  • 10% said they didn’t know

When asked to name 3 Female film directors/producers 5 people skipped the question, which is 25% of people. Of those who did answer 3 said they didn’t know any (15%), 4 people could only name one (20%) while 7 of those answers were actresses who were also directors (35%), which could show a trend. However, 45% of people could answer with 3 female directors/producers which is more than I expected.

When asked to name 3 Male film directors/producers only 2 people skipped the question (10%) 5% of people only named one male film director and another 5% naming only 2, with no one answering the question to say they didn’t know any. This means that 80% of those interviewed knew the names of 3 male directors.

When asked if 75% of blockbuster crews being male shows an equality problem in the industry:

  • 65% said yes
  • 25% said no
  • 10% said I don’t know

Finally, the last question on what kind of infographic people would rather watch had very similar answers and did not give a conclusive result.

  • 26.32% said The current status of women in film
  • 26.32% said Gender equality in film
  • 26.32% said The history of women in film
  • 21.05% said Feminist filmaking

“At their most numerous in 1917, 8 out of 113 Universal directors were women (about 7 percent), and Universal credited them with slightly more than 6 percent of its films. Overall the average of titles credited to women for the years 1916-19 is lower, about 4 percent. Intriguingly, however, women were concentrated in feature films, as opposed to the large volume of shorts and serials Universal released. In the same three-year period, the studio assigned 12 percent of its’ Bluebird brand feature films to the direction of women. “

“In the 1990s, Directors Guild of America statistics demonstrate, the industry paid women to direct between 7 and 9 percent the days worked in film production. Martha Lauzen’s survey of credits shows that in the early twenty-first century the proportion of women-directed titles declined from an anomalous high of 11 percent in 2000 to 5 percent in 2004 and had rebounded to 6 percent in 2007.”

I plan to include these statistics in my infographic as graphs, so that I can include as many statistics as possible and compare them to past years, without it being boring to watch.

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